A Well Deserved Salute to the Air Force Reserve

April 12, 2019

Founded April 14, 1948, and operating in various locations around the world, the Air Force Reserve has evolved from a “stand by” force for emergencies into a Major Command (MAJCOM) of the Active Duty Air Force. More than a fighting force, it serves other specialized capabilities not found in the regular active duty Air Force, such as two unique missions for which it serves as the sole USAF capability:

  • Aerial Spray Missions
  • Hurricane and Weather Reconnaissance
  • Aerial Firefighting, conducted in tandem with the Air National Guard

Citizen Airman, Official Magazine of the Air Force Reserve

Pegasus has Landedopens this edition of Citizen Airman with a story featuring the “new era in aerial refueling and mobility.” Then getting personal with a cool story about a hot rock band about an instructor pilot who when off duty rocks his guitar with his all-Airman band, “Call for Fire.” There’s always something unique and interesting among the eclectic collection of Citizen Airman articles from becoming a F-35 pilot to how a former Air Force Academy footballer is today a Brigadier General. For anyone interested in learning more about the Air Force Reserve or considering becoming a member, the bi-monthly Citizen Airman magazine offers complete and up-to-date information of interest to and about the Air Force Reservist.

Go to the Government Publishing Office online bookstore to purchase a single copy or sign up for a subscription.

A Magnificent Showcase: History, Heritage, and Art: The United States Air Force and the Air Force Art Program

If you’re looking for a “celebration that depicts how the connection between Airmen and artists began” who documented Air Force history, then this great coffee table top resource is for you. This illustrated, large-format book presents the U.S. Air Force Art Program’s depiction of the Air Force across the service’s history, starting with the birth of U.S. military aviation under the auspices of the Army.  It interweaves the story of the Art Program, including features on artists and their thoughts on significant works, with the history of the birth and growth of the Air Force itself.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Ed Kessler is a Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.


Discover U.S. National Park Service Posters

March 8, 2019

In the 1990s, National Park Service (NPS) commissioned Charley Harper, an American Modernist artist, to design 10 posters of wildlife. They wanted the art to capture the diversity of public lands in America; “from the lava flows of Hawaiian Volcanoes . . . to the icebergs of Glacier Bay, Alaska, . . . from the heights of the Rocky Mountains . . . to the depths of the Coral Reef.” Harper, an experienced traveler, drew inspiration from nature and used his unique style of minimal realism.

The poster with Hawaii’s volcanoes shows a typical volcanic eruption that destroys everything in its path but Harper also gives the audience multiple perspectives. Upon closer inspection, the art illustrates how life is created through a destructive force. The archipelago of Hawaii was formed by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago. The image of Hawaii that we know of today is a lush, tropical island with volcanoes. The greenery is direct result of volcanic soil which is rich in nutrients. “[The soil] are light and fluffy, low density and have remarkable water-holding capacity.” Another view is that lava is flowing into the ocean thus creating more land. The island of Hawaii, also known as Big Island, is continually growing and providing more habitats for life. Harper’s artistic style maybe minimalistic but is by no means simple.

Can you find multiple perspectives in the Rocky Mountains poster?

Several of the commissioned posters are available for purchase at the GPO Bookstore. The Catalog of Government Publications (CGP) is another GPO resource that can be used to discover Government posters. For example, the University of Iowa digitized Harper’s Glacier Bay poster, and it’s available through the CGP. The CGP can also be used to learn more about the extensive research Federal agencies have conducted about natural wonders in the U.S.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Vanathy Senthilkumar is a Systems Librarian at GPO.


Arts in the Parks

August 9, 2017

Since 1916, The National Park Service (NPS) has been conserving, preserving, and making its National Parks, National Historic Sites, and National Monuments accessible. The Library of Congress has a collection which provides an overview of the American conservation movement which inspired the Government to preserve and protect America’s natural resources. In addition to working to physically maintain sites, the NPS strives to keep and curate the stories and images created in and inspired by its more than 400 sites which include: national parks, preserves, monuments, historical parks, and other sites. The Arts in the Parks Program  provides links to resources ranging from sculpture gardens to grants for artists.

The Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont, has more than 500 works of art including nature and landscape paintings by artists of the Hudson River School. See the book Art and the American Conservation Movement to learn more about their collections and the movement.

William Henry Jackson lived in the West while working for the U.S. Geological Survey. As a professional photographer, he captured some of the earliest images of Yellowstone Park, the Tetons Mountains, and Mesa Verde. He also sketched and painted. An Eye for History: The Paintings of William Henry Jackson showcases his collection which is now owned by the Scotts Bluff National Monument’s Oregon Trail Museum.

The book Treasured Landscapes: National Park Service Art Collections Tell America’s Stories and the accompanying online exhibit bring together artwork from more than 50 NPS museum collections.

A Photographer’s Path: Images of National Parks Near the Nation’s Capital uses photographs to capture the beauty of NPS sites in the National Capitol Region.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Cynthia Earman is a Cataloging & Metadata Librarian in the Library Services & Content Management division of the U.S. Government Publishing Office.


Stunning Images of National Parks Around DC

November 16, 2016

Washington, DC is populated with renowned stone edifices and towering monuments. Some even call our nation’s capital “American Rome.” Of course, national treasures are not limited to the metropolitan and man-made. Sublime natural beauty abounds in the parks of the Potomac River watershed.

Battlefields, wildlife preserves, canals, aquatic gardens, forests. The National Capitol Region has them all. And the National Park Service celebrates them in “A Photographer’s Path: Images of National Parks Near the Nation’s Capital,” available through GPO.

024-005-01275-3_a-photographers-path-images-of-national-parks-near-the-nations-capitalA Photographer’s Path: Images of National Parks Near the Nation’s Capital

National Park Service photographer Thomas Paradis spotlights the idyllic, artful, and even curious scenes within the region. It’s a “pictorial journey” that “reveals the subtlety and nuance of our natural landscapes.”

Now, I’ll let the images speak for themselves:

Swallowtail perched on branch. Manassas National Park

Swallowtail perched on branch. Manassas National Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking toward Chimney Rock. Catoctin Mountain Park

Looking toward Chimney Rock. Catoctin Mountain Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heron over Great Falls. Great Falls Park, George Washington Memorial Parkway and Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Park

Heron over Great Falls. Great Falls Park, George Washington Memorial Parkway and Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS PUBLICATION?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Chelsea Milko is a Public Relations Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations Office.

 


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